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Why We Lost

Over a thirty-five year career, Daniel Bolger rose through the army infantry to become a three-star general, commanding in both theaters of the U.S. campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan. He participated in meetings with top level military and civilian players, where strategy was made and managed. At the same time, he regularly carried a rifle alongside rank-and-file soldiers in combat actions, unusual for a general. Now, as a witness to all levels of military command, Bolger offers a unique assessment of these wars, from 9/11 to the final withdrawal from the region. Writing with hard-won experience and unflinching honesty, Bolger makes the firm case that in Iraq and in Afghanistan, we lost -- but we didn't have to. Intelligence was garbled. Key decision makers were blinded by spreadsheets or theories. And, at the root of our failure, we never really understood our enemy. Why We Lost is a timely, forceful, and compulsively readable account of these wars from a fresh and authoritative perspective.

 

The Psychology of Organizational Change

In a rapidly changing world, with constantly shifting dynamics, organizational change may prove essential if businesses are to continue to succeed. The majority of research on organizational change adopts a macro outlook, focusing on strategic issues from the perspective of the organization and its management. This volume presents a micro perspective, focusing on the individual and, more specifically, the importance of the employees and their reactions to organizational change, and expanding on the understanding of why change initiatives frequently fail. This book constitutes an essential resource for scholars, students, and practitioners in the field of organizational change and development who strive to understand how to make change work not only for the organization, but also for its members.

 

 

Bleeding Talent

"This book will shape the debate on how to save the military from itself. The first part recognizes, indeed celebrates, what the military has done well in attracting and developing leadership talent. The book then examines the causes and consequences of the modern military's stifling personnel system, with a close look at strategic failures in Iraq and Afghanistan. The book also reports a new survey of active duty officers (done by the author) that reports what is driving the best and brightest to leave the service in frustration.

 

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